Outreach & Concerns

Ever since the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) began in the mid-17th Century, the silent Meetings for Worship were viewed not as an end in themselves, but as a still point of rest from which Friends would emerge to engage meaningfully with their society. Social engagement has therefore always been a crucial part of the Quaker Movement, and out of this commitment to put faith into action, Friends have developed several key Testimonies, which guide our practice. For example, our Peace Testimony has been shaped not out of any prior doctrinal or philosophical belief that war and violence are always wrong, but out of the spiritual experience of countless Friends down through the centuries whose daily experiences have testified that violence and war always make matters worse, while love and peace are consistently the surest path to resolving problems.

With these Testimonies serving as guideposts for how we tend to put our faith into action, we aspire to work together to alleviate suffering, build peace, to abolish slavery and oppression in all of its (often hidden) forms, standing up for those who cannot speak effectively for themselves, to protect the environment, etc. However, social action is also not an end in itself for Quakers. Rather, we aim to discern in our silent worship those areas of our immediate and wider social situation that are in need of loving participation by us as individuals and/or as a group. In the past, those who attend the Hong Kong Friends Meeting have devoted themselves to many such social causes; for details, see the Hong Kong Meeting history page. Currently individual members and attenders are serving Hong Kong society in a variety of ways, and the Meeting as a whole is seeking spiritual guidance on social concerns that call for our ministry as a group.